Brainwashed. Challenging The Myth of Black Inferiority

The myth of black inferiority??

This is by no means a new topic or newly debated phenomena.

However, author Tom Burrell explores the subject of ‘black inferiority complex’ in a very simple and easily digestible style –  as opposed to more heavily academic and statistic laden styles. I think Burrell is targeting a wide audience, rather than academics/sociologists etc…

In a nutshell, Burrell asserts that many black people (in terms of african decent) still ‘think and act like slaves’ and this is rooted in a psyche of black inferiority, fuelled by racist propaganda.

In my student days  (a long time ago) I studied sociology, psychology  and social policy – and have never grown tired of exploring the thoughts and ideas around why different groups in society seem to replicate certain patterns of behaviour, educational attainment, attitudes and values,  and socio-economic related patterns and problems….

This book focuses on aspects of afro caribbean (or more specifically African-American) psychology and its impact on the lives and thinking of afro caribbean people today – drawing on history to present  arguments and conclusions.

As with any social phenomena, it is difficult ( I would say impossible) to come to absolute finite conclusions on anything, as there are always multiple social variables at play in all circumstances, with variations between individuals and different perspectives depending on our own value and belief systems. This is not to say we discount plausible arguments – but simply keep an open mind.

It is beneficial to gain insight and weigh up the likelihood of some apparent ‘truths’ in order to recognise and/or make efforts to avoid negative patterns in our own lives or in supporting others.

From my personal perspective, Burrell articulates a lot of what I think many of us already know to hold much truth, though the roots and reasons to some extent – must include elements of the ‘individual’ and ‘choice’, even ‘weakness’, in the sense of choosing what seems easy and familiar, in keeping in line with the people you surround yourself with (and their expectations) and thereby living up to negative stereotypes and negative self images – rather than being different and choosing a different lifestyle, different attitude, having the courage to make different choices and take whatever rejection or ridicule that comes with it (resilience). I imagine many will argue that this is easier said than done, but not impossible, it has to come from within.

In some ways, negative and useless stereotypes seem even more apparent these days with social media perpetuating heavily alongside television, film, advertising and the music industry. Adults and young people are under pressure to live up to an array of damaging images in order to be deemed ‘cool’ get ‘likes’ or live up to a projected standard, and in terms of ‘black stereotypes’, black people can end up glorifying their own degradation in the process.

Anyway, enough of me rambling…if this topic interests you, the book is available on Amazon

I have left snapshots of text below to give you a sense of the tone and content content of the book.

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