An artistic Jovellanos farm

One more post from Cuba before I forget!

Ever been to an organic farm that’s also an art gallery and pottery production centre?

Well neither had I until this lovely little trip. This family run farm in the Cuban region of Jovellanos is home to it’s owners who have recently opened it up for tourist visits. The farm is also host to annual art galleries and events that attracts exhibitors from all around the globe.

All produce is organically grown, they make their own bricks, and pottery items, the eco-friendly lifestyle here is a great benchmark of an organic, holistic lifestyle.

Each year the family have to give a portion of everything the produce to the Cuban government.

There is a deep peacefulness on the farm, relaxing and tranquil as peacocks and chickens roam around going about their leisurely business.

There are countless varieties of trees, plants, flowers and crops which the family tend to with a little help from their friend Sindy, who helped to host our group during the visit.

Ripe fruit on every tree

Time for tea

On arrival, we took our seats and enjoyed the most delicious sweet herbal/fruit tea, piping hot in cute little farm made cups. The tea had a mix of ingredients including lemon and honey, I can’t remember the rest but it was ‘just’ divine!

Upcycled stones and rocks – a use is found for every available material on this farm

Yabadaba doo….

Delicious sweet tea

The farm is lush and green, thriving and growing fruitfully on every turn

Chained, cracked and broken

The family are hard at work in the pottery workshops, both young and old

Hand made pottery to sell

We were all offered the opportunity to sit and have a go at the pottery wheel, but no one wanted to get their hands dirty!!

Artistic exhibits strewn throughout the farm

the flower on the mango trees…..

This tractor is still proudly going strong today – and has been since the 1600s.

Our guide for the day pointing out the tree with an all seeing eye. These trees are thought to be spiritually sacred

The eye is not carved – but naturally occurring within some trees

The fruit on this tree looked like basketballs, but they are not edible

Standard bee hives

We stuck our fingers in a beehive!

That’s right, I kid you not. My most daring action of my entire Cuba trip lol. It may surprise you to hear that there are breeds of bees that do not sting, and we had the pleasure of meeting some of these at the farm and getting a taste of their honey straight from the hive with our own fingers!! The taste of the honey was like nothing I’ve tasted from any shop, I can only describe it as deliciously organic!

In memory of Martin Luther King

There was something a bit fishy about this piece….

Juice straight from the tree

Mine was a Papaya, banana, and mango juice – no words, just so good!

Lunch was a generous wholesome spread.

The old farm house

The family don’t live in this house, but they have preserved it as a impressive museum piece.

HΓ©ctor Correa, the owner of the farm and head of the family who made sure to come and greet us all personally, answer questions and shake hands thanking us wholeheartedly for coming to visit. We also met his son’s who were busy at work on the farm. Here he’s climbing out of the tractor that is still working since the 1600s. Hector and his wife could not have been any more hospitable, the warmth of their welcome alone, made the visit worthwhile

Left: our tour guide for the day Middle: HΓ©ctor Correa’s wife Right: Sindy, who also hosted on the farm.

 

Th hairiest tree I ever did see!!

We also had a mojito masterclass after lunch! Tip: grind your mint leaves, lemon juice and sugar a little before adding water/rum to get the flavours flowing

Banana plantations

Like a secret garden

A quick cuban percussion lesson on the way home

We looked at various interments used for salsa, rumba and cha cha cha percussion music, having a go on each one.

A few sights from earlier that day

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “An artistic Jovellanos farm

Leave your comments

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.